XDCR Regular Expressions

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    XDCR Regular Expressions can be used to specify character-matches, and thereby determine which documents should be included in filtered XDCR replications.

    XDCR Regular Expressions

    The following JavaScript regular expressions (RegExes) can be used for XDCR Advanced Filtering. Note that regular expressions are case-sensitive: a lowercase 'a' is distinct from an uppercase 'A'. You can enclose a range of characters in square brackets, to match against all of those characters.

    See Regular Expressions and Regular-Expressions.info, for further information.

    Expression Description

    [tT]here

    Matches against 'There' and 'there'

    [ ]

    Can be used on a range of characters separated by a - character.

    [0-9]

    Matches any digit.

    [A-Z]

    Matches any uppercase alpha character.

    [A-Za-z0-9]

    Matches any alphanumeric character.

    ^

    Matches the beginning of input. For example, ^a matches abb and ab; but does not match ba, bab, or bba.

    Used within square brackets, as the first character, ^ implies negation: therefore, [^0-9] matches against any character that is not a digit.

    $

    Matches the end of input. For example, a$ matches ba and bba; but does not match abb, bab, or ab.

    Ranges can be used to specify a group of characters. The following shortcuts are also available:

    Expression Description

    .

    Matches against any character.

    \d

    Matches against a digit [0-9]. *

    \D

    Matches against a non-digit [^0-9]. *

    \s

    Matches against a whitespace character (such as a tab, space, or line-feed character).*

    \S

    Matches against a non-whitespace character.*

    \w

    Matches against an alphanumeric character [a-zA-Z_0-9].*

    \W

    Matches against a non-alphanumeric character.*

    \xhh

    Matches against a control character (for the hexadecimal character hh).*

    \uhhhh

    Matches against a Unicode character (for the hexadecimal character hhhh).*

    Note that since the backslash character is used to denote a specific search expression, a double backslash (\\) must be entered when the backslash is the search target.

    To match against occurrences of a character or expression, you can use the following.

    Expression Description

    *

    Matches against zero or more occurrences of the previous character or expression.

    +

    Matches against one or more occurrences of the previous character or expression.

    ?

    Matches zero or one occurrence of the previous character or expression.

    (n)

    Matches n occurrences of the previous character or expression.

    (n,m)

    Matches from n to m occurrences of the previous character or expression.

    (n,)

    Matches at least n occurrences of the previous character or expression.